Tag Archives: Britney Spears

Hindsight Fashion: Tear-Away Pants

23 Feb

Throughout the decades, teenagers have attempted to prove their coolness by wearing questionable accessories, hairstyles and items of clothing. Hindsight Fashion is a section about those trends that, in Hindsight, we probably wish we hadn’t worn.

This week’s Hindsight Fashion is: Tear-Away Pants.

Tear-Away Pants were a fashion trend borne out of the utilitarian world of athletics. The pants were most often made out of slippery or shiny “windbreaker” fabric, and had snaps vertically spanning the side seams of the legs, allowing the wearer to rip the pants off at a moment’s notice. Presumably, the pants were invented so that athletic type people could remove layers of their outfits as they progressively got warmer throughout their workouts.

During the late 1990’s, Tear-Away Pants slowly began to leave the gym and creep into the day-to-day wardrobes of certain subsections of teenagers. In my high school, this meant that the boys who looked like even sweatier versions of Canadian Boy Band “B4-4” were almost always seen wearing a pair of glistening silver Tear-Away Pants with their wife-beater tank tops. These boys would also frequently have their pants ripped off by pranksters passing by, looking for a laugh.

Now, before all you athletic types start sending us nasty emails about how much you still love your Tear-Away Pants (“So comfortable! So easy! So shiny! How dare you?”), let me just say that in my opinion, Tear-Away Pants are absolutely acceptable outerwear under any sort of athletic circumstances. Going to the gym? Rock your Tear-Aways. Going for a run? Tear-Aways it is. Quickly transitioning from a chilly game of outdoor autumn basketball to your Bikram Yoga class? Definitely the Tear-Aways. But to wear these pants outside of the aforementioned situations, or transportation to and from said situations, is where we have, in hindsight, learned to draw the line.

Britney Spears is probably the most important celebrity to popularize the Tear-Away look. At the 2000 MTV Music Video Awards, she famously wore an entire Tear-Away outfit and tore it away to reveal a tiny skin-toned sparkly jumpsuit. Scandalous.

At some point in time, teenagers smartened up and decided to leave their Tear-Away Pants for gym class. Perhaps this was because they grew tired of smart-ass classmates disrobing them in the middle of the cafeteria. Or perhaps they just didn’t want to be associated with B4-4 anymore. In any event, legwear moved toward being a little less shiny and a little more sturdy. And although I love a good round of “Get Down” as much as the next girl, I must say that I think this was a very good thing indeed.

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If you liked this post, you’ll surely love this one and this one!

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Hindsight Fashion: Body Glitter

28 Oct

Throughout the decades, teenagers have attempted to prove their coolness by wearing questionable accessories, hairstyles and items of clothing. Hindsight Fashion is a section about those trends that, in Hindsight, we probably wish we hadn’t worn.

This week’s Hindsight Fashion is Body Glitter.

Body Glitter (glitter in any form worn on the skin or hair) was a trend in the 1990’s embraced by mainstream pop music, the underground rave scene, and the figure skating community. Body glitter took on many different forms including lotions, powders, sprays, and gels all designed to “subtly highlight” whichever surfaces they touched. Popular targets for body glitter were the clavicle bones, cleavage, and eyelids.

There was a period during my adolescence that essentially sits in a glitter induced haze. Everything in my life was covered in glitter. This was largely intentional, but not entirely. The down side to using glitter is that it gets (and stays) everywhere. Everywhere. If you used the powders, the dust would inevitably be carried off in a glitter cloud and cover all nearby surfaces. The aerosol sprays were so powerful that one might find sparkles rooms away. And even if the application was clean, the glitter would rub off on everything you touched and be impossible to remove.

For me, a body glitter fanatic, the regular cosmetic brand glitters were not enough. I needed bigger sparkles. Better coverage. More impact. So I began using the bottles of craft glitter that are sold in hobby stores next to the crazy glue and alpaca yarn. Practically daily (yes, I even wore this to school), I would try to apply this glitter to my eyelids, only to have a giant hunk of sparkles fall into my eye, much to my Optometrist father’s chagrin. Such is the price of beauty I suppose.

Seeing as my Mother is still painstakingly trying to remove these sparkly little buggers from the surfaces of my teenaged bedroom, I think we’re safe to say that body glitter won’t ever need to make a comeback. After all, it never really goes away in the first place.

Hindsight Fashion: The Baby Tee

30 Sep

Throughout the decades, teenagers have attempted to prove their coolness by wearing questionable accessories, hairstyles and items of clothing. Hindsight Fashion is a new section about those trends that, in Hindsight, we probably wish we hadn’t worn.

This week’s Hindsight Fashion is the Baby Tee.

The Baby Tee (any t-shirt that is both tight and short) was a trend that arose in the mid-nineties, largely in response to the massive teen movie hit, Clueless. Celebrities such as The Spice Girls, Pamela Anderson, and Britney Spears were all fans of the Baby Tee.

The Baby Tee was often seen with a graphic element across the chest, such as the heart pictured on the late Brittany Murphy on the Clueless movie poster (right). Other popular Baby Tee graphics included happy faces and tie-dye patterns.

The Baby Tee was largely a female trend. Its short length exposed the midriff of its wearers, highlighting an emerging trend at the time, navel piercing.

Baby Tees sustained their popularity through the nineties via their usage in the Band Tee realm. I personally can say that I had Baby Tees proclaiming the names of each of my favorite teenaged bands: NOFX, Less Than Jake, The Planet Smashers, the list goes on.

Popularity of the Baby Tee began to wane in the early 2000’s as low-rise jeans became the norm. T-shirt hemlines began to creep downward to meet the waist of lower rise styles. Current popular hemlines hitting at or below the hip have nudged the Baby Tee out of the spotlight in favor of a slightly more modest look.

Will the Baby Tee return to our closets once more? Britney Spears likes to think so. And maybe that answers our question.